Some of our currently open positions:

Changing and Chosing a Job

A little help in making the decision.

Nobody can tell you whether you should leave your current position or accept another. Perhaps, however, these questions and considerations will help you make your decision

Are you satisfied with your current position?

Why did you accept your current position?

Have you been at the current position long enough to build a stable career history?

Most employers look for stays of at least one year for line and learning positions and histories of two or more years for management and supervisory staff. If you have a choppy job history it may be better to stay where you are. If you take the wrong job it is better to leave very soon than to leave after several months.

Why are you dissatisfied with your current job?

If you are dissatisfied, have you communicated this in a civilized and mature manner to your supervisors or employer? Are you sure that there is no plan in place to correct the problems?

What do you know about and expect from the new position?

Is your motiviation moving on and up or just a change of wallpaper?

Is your desire or decision to effect change really an expression for some other personal dissatisfaction?

What about compensation?

Will the new position advance your career?

Other considerations:

These are questions. It is up to you to decide if your answers warrant your changing positions, or if you need to remain in your present position.

When you decide to leave your position or to seek or accept another, you might want to consider the following points.

These are questions. It is up to you to decide if your answers warrant your changing positions, or if you need to remain in your present position.

Why did you accept your current position?

Have you been at the current position long enough to build a stable career history?

These are only questions. It is up to you to decide if the answers warrant your changing positions, or if you need to remain in your present position.